Charleston and the South Carolina Lowcountry, March 2010

These live oak trees were likely planted over three hundred years ago. The house is long gone from most of the South Carolina plantations, but the alley of live oaks remains on dozens of properties.

These live oak trees were likely planted over three hundred years ago. The house is long gone from most of the South Carolina plantations, but the alley of live oaks remains on dozens of properties.


(Prints available)
Ancient Sentries - B&W

These live oaks have likely stood on the road to a South Carolina plantation for over three hundred years


(Prints available)

Matt and I took a trip to coastal South Carolina for a few days this spring. It was a quick trip and we hoped that we would catch the azaleas and dogwoods in full bloom. Due to the unseasonably cold winter we had in the South this year, the azaleas were about three weeks late in their bloom schedule. Although we didn’t catch the blooms exactly like we expected, there were still many other subjects to photograph.
We spent the better part of one day walking the historic district of Charleston from before sunrise until the light got too flat about noon. Charleston is beautiful in any season due to the quantity of colonial era homes, their architectural detail, and the lush landscaping of the district. Later that day we visited several of the plantation homes and gardens found in the area.
The following day we travelled to Edisto Island to photograph the sunrise on that barrier island. The day dawned cloudy so we didn’t see our sunrise, but it made for great conditions to photograph other beach scenes, farms, churches, and landscapes in the area. We spent the remainder of the day looking for oak alleys on old plantation sites. In many cases the plantation homes are gone, but live oak alleys planted hundreds of years ago remain standing. By our estimate there are hundreds of these ghosts of the past still standing waiting to be rediscovered.
On the way home, we visited the Francis Biedler National Forest and a state park featuring cypress trees. Of the two the National Forest was by far the most interesting. We followed a boardwalk into the swamp and had terrific views of old growth forests, wildlife, and woodlands unique to this area of the country. We both had a blast and hated to head home. There was enough to photograph for weeks to come, but school and work were calling.
More images from the trip and the coastal areas of the South can be viewed here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s